ESP Biography



XINYU ZHANG, UCSD professor who designs smartphones




Major: Electrical&Computer Engineering

College/Employer: UCSD

Year of Graduation: Not available.

Picture of Xinyu Zhang

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Xinyu Zhang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California San Diego. Prior to joining UC San Diego, he was an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 2012 to 2017. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan in 2012. His research interest lies in wireless systems and ubiquitous computing, and more specifically in (i) designing next-generation wireless architectures based on millimeter-wave, large-scale distributed antennas, and physical-layer informed protocols; (ii) designing ubiquitous systems that leverage wireless signals to sense micro-locations and micro-activities at near-vision precision. He is the recipient of ACM MobiCom Best Paper Award in 2011, NSF CAREER Award in 2014, and Google Research Award in 2017. His research has led to multiple tech transfers including a startup company specialized in visible light positioning.

Professor Zhang has taught the following courses:
Multi-User Communications (UCSD ECE 257A, Fall’17);
Mobile Computing Laboratory (UW-Madison ECE454, Fall’16, 15, 13, 12);
Communication Networks (UW-Madison ECE537, Spring’17, 14);
Digital System Fundamentals (UW-Madison ECE352, Spring’16, 15);



Past Classes

  (Look at the class archive for more.)


Smartphones Replaces PC, Then What Will Replace Smartphones? in Splash Spring 2018
Our digital world has evolved over multiple generations. We have witnessed how smartphones replaced PC to become the dominant personal computing devices. But what will happen after smartphones? In this course, I will introduce some science-fiction quality research that incubates the next-generation mobile devices and Internet-of-Things. Examples include indoor-GPS, battery-free sensors, and wireless communication devices that carry information through laser-like beams.